Category Archives: anthrozoology

Diversity in Depth: Equity Between Humans and Non-humans in Nature-Culture

Date: Tuesday 24 November – time: 19.00-21.00

With planet earth at risk, why do you fuzz over gender and diversity issues rather than prioritizing current ecological challenges? Is societal discrimination the most pressing problem when humankind’s survival is at stake?” Questions such as these are not uncommon. However, they suggest a false opposition. Environmental problems and concerns with social equity do not compete with each over pride of place on academic and political agenda’s. On the contrary, they are directly related in that they both feed off a common ground. In this webinar, Pim Martens  and Lies Wesseling will expose this common ground, by revealing how the exploitation of humans and non-humans are both rooted in an instrumentalist conception of nature. They will also sketch the contours of alternative conceptions of the more-than-human world.

All members of the UM community are warmly invited to participate. This webinar is also part of the Maastricht Summerschool on Human and Animal Relations and Interactions taking place on November 21 and 22, 2020. Participation is free but you need to enroll before November 20, 2020, by send an email to: Lies.Wesseling@Maastrichtuniversity.nl.

Speakers:

Pim Martens, Professor of Sustainable Development, Chair Platform Human and non-human Animal Relations, and  Interations (HARI, FASoS), and Senior Fellow in the Ethics of the Anthropocene Program at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.  

 Lies Wesseling, director Centre for Gender and Diversity and Professor of Cultural Memory, Gender and Diversity at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

Religion and Animals (4): Interview Hindu Prince Jayasinhji Jhala

Interview with Jayasinhji Jhala, the 47th Jhallesvar His Highness Maharaja Sriraj of Halvad- Dhrangadhra and the cultural custodian of the Peoples of Jhalavad and protector of all life forms.

Our dominant current socio-economic and political systems have become decoupled from the larger ecology of life. Our relationship with the natural environment and animals has changed dramatically over time. My Fellowship ‘Ethics of the Anthropocene‘ (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) intends to discuss these past patterns and future pathways with (indigenous) religious leaders.

Above the fourth interview in a series of conversations with religious leaders and their vision on how we should relate to nature and the animals within.

More interviews will follow!

See all interviews at the project page.

Maastricht University Weekend Course Human and Animal Relationships and Interactions (HARI)

21-22 November (Weekend Course) (1 ECTS)

Register here.

Though we live with them, eat them, love them, and wear them, we give very little academic attention to the roles of animals in society. The underlying theme of the course will be re-evaluating our understandings of animals and gauging the individual and collective responsibilities that we, as humans, must negotiate with non-human animals.

This course will also explore and consider the different types of relationships between animals and humans in contemporary society from e.g. a historical, social and linguistic perspectives. Topics include companion animals, animal communication and emotions, animal-assisted therapy.

At the end of this course, students should able to:
• exhibit strong critical thinking skills in their study of the interactions between humans and nonhuman animals and of the roles of nonhuman animals in human society.
• synthesize interdisciplinary information as it relates to anthrozoology.
• identify strengths and weaknesses in arguments regarding human and nonhuman animals.
• construct a written, evidence-based argument on a HARI topic.

Furthermore, the students will:
• Understand different perspectives regarding animals
• Understand the state-of the–art of animal emotions and animal communication

This is an interdisciplinary course, so open for all students with a genuine interest in critical animal studies and how we, as humans, interact with them.

Religion and Animals (3): Interview Maya Priest Audelino Sac Coyoy

Interview with Audelino Sac Coyoy, a Maya-K’iche’ priest and political scientist who currently teaches at the Universidad Rafael Landívar Campus de Quetzaltenango in Guatemala.

Our dominant current socio-economic and political systems have become decoupled from the larger ecology of life. Our relationship with the natural environment and animals has changed dramatically over time. My Fellowship ‘Ethics of the Anthropocene‘ (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) intends to discuss these past patterns and future pathways with (indigenous) religious leaders.

Indigenous worldviews

Indigenous cultures have a unique view of the world that’s distinct from the mainstream. Learning about indigenous cultures and their relationships with animals, may be a way we can begin to address the sustainability challenges we see today. Above the third interview in a series of conversations with religious leaders and their vision on how we should relate to nature and the animals within.

More interviews will follow!

See all interviews at the project page.

Religion and Animals (2): Interview Dakota Chief Phil Lane Jr

Interview with Phil Lane Jr. Phil is an enrolled member of the Ihanktonwan Dakota and Chickasaw Nations. Chief Phil Lane Jr. is an internationally recognized indigenous leader in human and community development.

Our dominant current socio-economic and political systems have become decoupled from the larger ecology of life. Our relationship with the natural environment and animals has changed dramatically over time. My Fellowship ‘Ethics of the Anthropocene‘ (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) intends to discuss these past patterns and future pathways with (indigenous) religious leaders.

Indigenous worldviews

Indigenous cultures have a unique view of the world that’s distinct from the mainstream. Learning about indigenous cultures and their relationships with animals, may be a way we can begin to address the sustainability challenges we see today. Above the second interview in a series of conversations with religious leaders and their vision on how we should relate to nature and the animals within.

More interviews will follow!

See all interviews at the project page.

New Book: Sustanimalism

Order here.

“I think we should be more outspoken when we see the detrimental effects of our activities to the natural environment and the animals within. In this book, without claiming to cover the full complexity, I explore the relationships between human and non-human animals. This ranges from our bound with close companions like cats and dogs, to public attitudes towards exotic animals living far way or in zoos. I also argue that animal welfare should be central in the sustainability debate: what I term ‘sustanimalism’ (in Dutch, the combination of ‘dieren’ (animals), and ‘duurzaamheid’ (sustainability) leads to the neologism ‘dierzaamheid’). More respect for animals and nature is key to a sustainable society.” – Pim Martens

The e-book is free available at Global Academy Press. In return, a donation to the AnimalWise Foundation would be very much appreciated! A hard-copy can be ordered through Bol or Amazon.

Religion and Animals (1): Interview Aztec Anita Sanchez

Interview with Anita Sanchez. Anita was born into a Midwest family that was economically poor, yet rich in Mexican-American and Aztec Indian heritage. She specializes in indigenous wisdom, diversity and inclusion, leadership, culture and promoting positive change in our world.

Our dominant current socio-economic and political systems have become decoupled from the larger ecology of life. Our relationship with the natural environment and animals has changed dramatically over time. My Fellowship ‘Ethics of the Anthropocene‘ (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) intends to discuss these past patterns and future pathways with (indigenous) religious leaders.

Indigenous worldviews

Indigenous cultures have a unique view of the world that’s distinct from the mainstream. Learning about indigenous cultures and their relationships with animals, may be a way we can begin to address the sustainability challenges we see today. Above the first interview in a series of conversations with religious leaders and their vision on how we should relate to nature and the animals within.

More interviews will follow!

See all interviews at the project page.