Indigenous and Religious Views on Animals (10): Interview Islamic Poet and Dawah worker Khaleel Ur Rehman Chishti

Interview with Khaleel Ur Rehman Chishti, Islamic Researcher, Lecturer, Poet and Dawah worker.

Our dominant current socio-economic and political systems have become decoupled from the larger ecology of life. Our relationship with the natural environment and animals has changed dramatically over time. My Fellowship ‘Ethics of the Anthropocene‘ (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) intends to discuss these past patterns and future pathways with representatives of various indigenous cultures and religious beliefs. Learning from them about our relationship with animals may be a way we can begin to address the sustainability challenges we see today.

Above the tenth interview in this series. More interviews will follow!

See all interviews at the Words of Wisdom and project page.

Nieuw centrum wil dieren serieus nemen

In de natuurwetenschappen worden dieren als objecten bestudeerd, en in de sociale- en de geesteswetenschappen staat de mens centraal. Het nieuwe Centrum voor DierMens Studies wil in de wetenschap meer aandacht voor de relatie tussen beide, waarbij ook dieren als actieve, sociale en intelligente individuen worden beschouwd.

Mede-oprichter en voorzitter Maarten Reesink (wetenschapper DierMens Studies):

“In de wetenschap worden dieren bijna alleen gezien al interessant onderwerp voor de biologie, en verder meestal als objecten gezien of gebruikt. Terwijl in onze mensenmaatschappij dieren juist overal aanwezig zijn: als huisgenoten, werkdieren en als voedsel, in films, op tv en in onze populaire cultuur, in dierentuinen en in het wild. In DierMens Studies staan al die vormen van contact tussen mens en dier centraal. Waarbij dieren niet worden gezien als gebruiksvoorwerpen of decorstukken in onze mensenmaatschappij, maar als gelijkwaardige medebewoners van deze wereld.”

In januari 2021 is het Centrum voor DierMens Studies opgericht door onderzoekers en studenten van de Universiteit van Amsterdam. Door het interdisciplinaire vakgebied DierMens Studies te promoten wil het Centrum een brug slaan tussen natuurwetenschappen en sociale- en geesteswetenschappen. Het Centrum is een platform voor wetenschappers en studenten aan alle Nederlandse universiteiten die zich bezighouden met de vele relaties tussen mens en dier. Iedereen die is geïnteresseerd in onze band met (andere) dieren kan er terecht voor informatie, wetenschappelijke publicaties en onderwijsaanbod.

Op deze manier vraagt het Centrum academische aandacht voor de plaats van dieren in de maatschappij, en biedt het een netwerk voor de groei van het internationale vakgebied (Human) Animal Studies in Nederland. Het centrum wil de groei van dit vakgebied in Nederland verder stimuleren en een brug slaan tussen universiteiten, onderzoekers, studenten en een breed publiek met een interesse in de relaties tussen mens en dier.

Naast het delen van kennis en het bieden van een platform en een netwerk, gaat het Centrum evenementen en netwerkbijeenkomsten organiseren.

Het Centrum voor DierMens Studies is opgericht door (oud-) UvA-studenten Caatje Kluskens en Fien Lindelauff in samenwerking met UvA-docent Human-Animal Studies Maarten Reesink en professors Leonie Cornips en Pim Martens van de Universiteit van Maastricht.

Meer informatie: https://www.diermensstudies.nl/

Indigenous and Religious Views on Animals (9): Interview Anishinabe Elder Solomon Wawatie

Interview with Solomon Wawatie, the Weasel of the Bear Clan, a faith keeper of his culture and elder of his community.

Our dominant current socio-economic and political systems have become decoupled from the larger ecology of life. Our relationship with the natural environment and animals has changed dramatically over time. My Fellowship ‘Ethics of the Anthropocene‘ (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) intends to discuss these past patterns and future pathways with representatives of various indigenous cultures and religious beliefs. Learning from them about our relationship with animals may be a way we can begin to address the sustainability challenges we see today.

Above the ninth interview in this series. More interviews will follow!

See all interviews at the Words of Wisdom and project page.

Indigenous and Religious Views on Animals (8): Interview Parakuiyo Maasai Leader Adam Kuleit Mwarabu

Interview with Adam Kuleit Mwarabu, Parakuiyo Maasai leader. He is an advocate in the areas of human rights, environment, culture, peace, and gender in the Parakuiyo community.

Our dominant current socio-economic and political systems have become decoupled from the larger ecology of life. Our relationship with the natural environment and animals has changed dramatically over time. My Fellowship ‘Ethics of the Anthropocene‘ (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) intends to discuss these past patterns and future pathways with representatives of various indigenous cultures and religious beliefs. Learning from them about our relationship with animals may be a way we can begin to address the sustainability challenges we see today.

Above the eight interview in this series. More interviews will follow!

See all interviews at the Words of Wisdom and project page.

Indigenous and Religious Views on Animals (7): Interview Canon Theologian Ruth Valerio

Interview with Ruth Valerio, Canon Theologian at Rochester Cathedral, Global Advocacy and Influencing Director for Tearfund.

Our dominant current socio-economic and political systems have become decoupled from the larger ecology of life. Our relationship with the natural environment and animals has changed dramatically over time. My Fellowship ‘Ethics of the Anthropocene‘ (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) intends to discuss these past patterns and future pathways with representatives of various indigenous cultures and religious beliefs. Learning from them about our relationship with animals may be a way we can begin to address the sustainability challenges we see today.

Above the seventh interview in this series. More interviews will follow!

See all interviews at the project page.

Indigenous and Religious Views on Animals (6): Interview Rabbi Natan Slifkin

Interview with Natan Slifkin, popularly known as the “Zoo Rabbi”, a British-born Israeli Orthodox rabbi and director of the Biblical Museum of Natural History in Beit Shemesh, Israel.

Our dominant current socio-economic and political systems have become decoupled from the larger ecology of life. Our relationship with the natural environment and animals has changed dramatically over time. My Fellowship ‘Ethics of the Anthropocene‘ (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) intends to discuss these past patterns and future pathways with representatives of various indigenous cultures and religious beliefs. Learning from them about our relationship with animals may be a way we can begin to address the sustainability challenges we see today.

Above the sixth interview in this series. More interviews will follow!

See all interviews at the project page.

Workshop “The Green Deal: What are its implications for animals and nature?”

This is the first thematic workshop within RELAY project.

Introduction workshop by Pim Martens & Ceren Pekdimir

‘The atmosphere is warming and the climate is changing with each passing year. One million of the eight million species on the planet are at risk of being lost. Forests and oceans are being polluted and destroyed. The European Green Deal is a response to these challenges. It is a new growth strategy that aims to transform the EU into a fair and prosperous society, with a modern, resource-efficient and competitive economy where there are no net emissions of greenhouse gases in 2050 and where economic growth is decoupled from resource use. It also aims to protect, conserve and enhance the EU’s natural capital, and protect the health and well-being of citizens from environment-related risks and impacts. At the same time, this transition must be just and inclusive. It must put people first, and pay attention to the regions, industries and workers who will face the greatest challenges.’ (The Green Deal).

This workshop will discuss how ‘The Green Deal’ is tackling this issue and give a ‘voice’ to the voiceless. It will examine the policies behind the Green Deal in relation to the role of Nature and Animals in our Society and discuss the Green Deal’s shortcomings with regard to the ‘voiceless’ members of the European society and of the regions beyond the EU that might be affected by Green Deal-related policies. The central question of the webinar will be: ‘What are the current issues with regard to the ‘true’ sustainability goals the Green Deal should pursue and what actions are required to give animals and nature a more prominent role in the Green Deal debates?’

Venue: This workshop will take place online via Zoom. Please make sure to register for updates and information on how to connect. 

Registration:  Please follow this link to register. The deadline for registration is 18 January.

Together in an Ever-Changing World

An online course: register here!

We understand your desire to make changes for people, animals, and the planet

Like you, we care about our home, planet Earth. About the wellbeing of people and animals and the conservation of species, and we know the challenges of balancing all these goals.

We combine stories, science and practical experiences with compassion and creativity to create an empathetic sustainable, and caring community. 

This seminar is organised by Sabrina Brando from AnimalConcepts & PAWS, Irma Verhoeven from Earth Charter International, Pim Martens from AnimalWise, and Manila De luliis from World of Walas.

The connection between people, animals, and the planet is too important to ignore 

Join us on 23 January 2021 to explore your individual and our collective opportunities to act for people, animals, and the planet!

Indigenous and Religious Views on Animals (5): Interview Bishop Harrie Smeets

Interview with Harrie Smeets, a Dutch Roman Catholic bishop. Since December 8, 2018, he has been the 24th bishop of the diocese of Roermond and has chosen as a motto: love people in God’s name.

Our dominant current socio-economic and political systems have become decoupled from the larger ecology of life. Our relationship with the natural environment and animals has changed dramatically over time. My Fellowship ‘Ethics of the Anthropocene‘ (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) intends to discuss these past patterns and future pathways with representatives of various indigenous cultures and religious beliefs. Learning from them about our relationship with animals may be a way we can begin to address the sustainability challenges we see today.

Above the fifth interview in this series. More interviews will follow!

See all interviews at the project page.